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Metalock Engineering's "Flying Workshop"

During a routine docking of the cruise liner "Marco Polo" in November 2001, cracks were detected on the portside Sulzer 7 RD 76 main engine, around bearing block No. 8.

After an inspection by our specialists, the Metalock Engineering Group was assigned the repair job

Since the ship was already bound to a schedule, an immediate repair could not be carried out. The ship’s owner then decided to continue as scheduled, but for the time being, to use a reduced engine output. In the meantime, it was decided to change the timetable and take the ship out of use for 14 days. After an inspection by our specialists, the Metalock Engineering Group was assigned the repair job and, in consultation with the owner and the classification society DNV, issued an expert opinion.

The work was completed, all to the satisfaction of the owner

Marco Polo

The work was completed, all to the satisfaction of the owner, classification society and insurance company, in 10 days, 3 days earlier than planned. 

Metalock travelled to Copenhagen with 22 technicians and 4 tons of equipment

At the end of May 2002, the Metalock Engineering Group travelled to Copenhagen with 22 technicians and 4 tons of equipment and began with the repair work immediately after the ship arrived. Four old, cracked crank case plates were removed, the tension rod and foundation bolts in the repair zone were unfastened, and the bearing block was properly positioned in accordance with web deflection. The steel plates provided by the company Sulzer Innotec were then cut out using a laser and simultaneously welded in the engine room by 4 experts. The position of bearing block No. 8 was controlled and corrected, as needed, by constant web deflection measuring.

After the welding work was finished, bearing shell No. 8 was restored and bedded. Further assembly work, such as tightening of the tension rod and foundation bolts, cleaning of the oil outlet filter and removal of the dust cover, along with flushing of the crank case and performing of test runs and sea trials, concluded the repair work.

The work was completed, all to the satisfaction of the owner, classification society and insurance company, in 10 days, 3 days earlier than planned. 

Gallery showing the process

From left:
Crank case with crankshaft.
Plates cut out in the engine room.
New plates welded in the engine room.
Outer plates in the crank case